4 secrets to becoming a guest on Top Tv Talk

4 secrets to becoming a guest on the top TV talk shows.

The phone is lazy. You hear an authoritative voice saying: * Hello, I am the manufacturer of … Good Morning America or Oprah, or Larry King Live * or any other top-notch program, call it. It’s your big moment, the break for which you waited. After you caught your breath, what are you doing?

Producers make an immediate assessment of you in thirty seconds or less. If you get the prestigious call from a producer, you’re not just talking to him: you’re auditioning. You are selected to be accepted or eliminated as a guest on their show. How can you pass the audition?

Secret # 1: Ask Before You Talk

Before you even open your mouth to blow yourself and your story to the producer, ask them a simple question: * Can you tell me about the kind of show you see? * In other words, the producer asks the corner he plans to take.

It has two advantages. First, it gives you a moment to overcome the shock and collect your thoughts.

Secondly, if you hear the answer from the producer, you can customize your pitch according to the type of information it seeks. Now listen to the corner in which he is interested and adjust your points. Publishers often use this technique to discuss their clients on presentations. They * get * before they * give * – so they are in a good position to tell only the most relevant information about their client.

Secret # 2: Wow the Producers with Brevity

Follow the advice of jazz music Dizzy Gillespie: * It’s not how much you play. That’s how much you leave. * Keep your list of call points by phone when you call a producer (or a producer calls you) so you will be concise. You have practiced all your points so that they can sound natural and inviting. Be prepared with different angles or places, different ways to move your information. * Nobody gets on these shows without a pre-interview, * says Leslie Rossman, publisher. * Be a good interview, but do not worry about the product you want to sell, because if you are a good gas and you make big TV, they will want you. *

And remember the words of Robert Frost: * Half of the world is composed of people who have something to say and can not, and the other half who have nothing to say and keep saying that * 3:

Secret # Do not prove a nutcase

If you’re nutcase on the air, the producer will lose their jobs. What is a wrench? You may think it’s a positive feature to be enthusiastic (and it is), but someone who is too zealous about his passion is considered a nut. Best saleswriter and writer Richard Price talks about this phenomenon as * The dangerous excitement of goodness. * He says, * What happens, you can get very excited by your own strength to do well. * Do not carry away this. excitement.

One way to tell if you’re too diligent is to hit your point at the highest speed with the power of a locomotive that pulls the toothed endlessly. I remember a man calling me how he handled Starbucks self-handed – who felt he had wronged him. He wanted me to promote his case. While it could have been a good David versus Goliath-type story, he was long on emotion and short on facts. Some statistics or figures would have tempered his mania.

But he never checked me to see if he had my interest. By speaking out loud and scarcely a pause for a breath, he appeared as a man who could not take direction properly. His anxiety was apart, not tempting.

When you talk to a producer talk for 30 seconds or so and then type in: * Is this the kind of information you’re looking for? * Listen to other oral directions, such as encouraging grunts, or * uh huhs *

Secret # 4: Can you mark? The big point? *

Contributors to the Popular Radio Program * This American life, hosted by Ira Glass, called the exciting epiphany at the end of a story. Big Point. * This is the moment when the narrator gives his perspective on the story to elevate it from everyday to universal.

Another radio personality, Garrison Keillor, is a master to it. He tells story stories (not good advice for a long time) and connects all the strings in a coherent and satisfying way. As a big guest, you want to relieve your story with a great lookout point that helps the audience to see the meaning of your story in their world and world as a whole. Rather than hit them with a two to four, you want to share your insights with a featherish one. By ramming your story, you warn the producer for being a thinker, and can add great insights and clarity to a story that increases the appeal.

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