You know what they say about rules? In fact, they say a lot of rules, but here are two rules made to break and you need to know the rules before breaking it. While Judge Dredd may not agree with the first, the second is definitely true and never more so than writing a song.The song structure may not be the first thing you think when you start writing. You probably work on the verse or choir, or maybe you have a good riff that you want to expand to a song.

This way you get it and then you start thinking about the other parts – the intro, how many verses, middle eight, you want an instrumental, the end …

Some song genres have a fairly rigid format, others are more flexible and you have to know where you can bend the rules and why you do not want to make your song stand out from the others. Let’s look at the sections you get in most songs and the part they play in song construction.

Song parts

Intro.

Yes, it leads you to the song. It can be two, four or eight degrees long or longer. Some songs do not have an intro at all. A pop song intro often reminds the choir or the hook. In a club song, it is often a good idea to have eight competing rhythms to help the DJ to mix with your song. They say that music publishers usually listen only to the first 20 seconds of a song before deciding to reject it if you send material to a publisher, shorten the intro and enter the song as soon as possible. Save the 5-minute intro for the CD version.

Verse.

This is the preamble of the choir. It sets the scene, certainly lyrics, and as the verses progress, they often tell a story or tell episodes out of a situation, although it is not necessary at all. They are typically eighteen or sixteen bars long and melodies are usually not as strong as the choir, although it is not necessarily necessary. It seems, however, that the songwriter ran out of ideas while writing the verse. One of the strengths of The Beatles songs is that verses and fever are equally strong and most people can sing themselves through most Beatles hits. Not so with many songs where the verses are little more than filler to get you to the choir.

Choir.

This piece that everyone remembers flirts and sings. It should be the strongest part of the song and is usually the hook. It is usually eight or sixteen bars long.

Mid eight As a song progresses, there is a danger of boredom to the listener. The middle eight gives them a break and usually comes to a few verses and fever. Some people think of it as an alternative verse and it’s one way to look at it. It often modulates another key or represents a new chord progression and usually does not include the song. But all too often it’s just an excuse to waffle for a few bars. Although it is called the middle eight, it can be four or sixteen bars long.

Bridge.

Many people use the terms ‘middle eight’ and ‘bridge’ synonymously and so popular is this use that it would be unclear to differ. But among those who prefer the difference, a bridge is a short section used to bridge the gap between verse and choir. It may only be two or four years long, and it is often used when the verse and the choir are so different from each other that an ‘add-on’ phrase helps them bring them together.

Instrumental.

It is part of the song without any choir. Yes, okay. It’s often an instrumental version of the verse or choir, it can be a improvised variation on either of these, or it can be a completely different song and set chords entirely. Sometimes it fits into a song where a vowel is eight different.

Breakdown / Break.

This term originated from the early 1900’s, as it was common to either stop or stop it completely while a crane dancer would support her well. The term ‘break’ is sometimes used to indicate an instrumental part. Breakdown is now mostly used in dance music for the part where the percussion is broken or reduced, and it can be the dance equivalent of the middle eight.

Outro / end.

One day, the songs had definite ends, but in the middle of the 1950’s, in the era of eclipse and songwriters, they thought that they would never have to write an end again. However, fade-outs have become such clicks to the extent that they invented, and so songwriters started writing again. In order to do that, you can, as you wish, and take into account that the ends of most songs are chatted or shortened by radio DJ’s and mixed by club DJ’s, you only have your artistic integrity and your CD listeners to to answer Some songs work very well with fade out, but listen to songs in your chosen genre to see how other writers reach ends. But whatever you do, avoid as the plague ends the three timetable.

Hook.

The hook is not a song as such; Rather, it is the term used to describe the part of the song that remembers and sings people. That’s why they buy the record. It is usually the choir, although it does not have to be the whole choir, but just a two or four-line phrase. It can be an instrumental riff like in Whiter Shade of Pale or Smoke on the Water, or a processed voice like in Cher’s Believe.

Even though we now describe

the parts of a song, let’s see how they are arranged regularly. The most popular arrangement from far away is simply choked and repeated. Here are two variations about the theme:

Intro

Verse 1

Chorus

Verse 2

Chorus

Chorus

Outro

Intro

Verse 1

Verse 2

Chorus

Verse 3

Midden acht

Chorus

Chorus

Outro

You get the picture. However, these are conventions rather than rules, so you can customize, change or ignore it as you like it. But they have developed for a reason and it is simply to appoint the song as soon as possible to the listener.

Listen to some of the 80’s Aitken and Waterman hits (it’s not compulsory if you really can not wear it) and you’ll see that most people follow the simplest format, repeating the listener as much as possible. as possible. They tend to be:

Intro (similar to the choir)

Verse 1

Chorus

Verse 2

Mid eight

Chorus

Chorus

Outro

Note that the hook is immediately in the intro, there is only one verse before the choir so you get it faster, and the choir tends to repeat at the end just to print the hook firmly in your mind.

There are clear exceptions to these formats. Ambient, trance, chill-out music and the like are obvious candidates. This allows you to start at the beginning and work through to the end and create a developing music form without any clear verse / choir structure. Genres like trance tend to build several kerecendos in the song. But even these types of songs often have a hook or two that listeners can hang their hat on.

Bou-ups and downs

Keep in mind that the purpose of a song is to let the listeners listen and not let them get bored, you need variety within the song. If you only sing and sing a guitar, you will not cut the mustard unless you are in a national club. The usual method is to start with a simple arrangement and add it as the song progresses.

Thus, the first verse can consist of light drums, bass and rhythm guitar. As you move in the second verse, you can add strings or a synthesis. A drum stuff brings you into the choir which includes thicker drums, maybe some extra percussions, a fuller string arrangement and maybe a head start. When you return to the verse, you return to the simpler arrangement.

The middle eight is usually a lighter arrangement than. The choir and gives you the opportunity to use different instruments if you want. When you hit the second choir, add backing vocals and a main editor. The final choir is the highlight of the song and you can add more backing vocals more percussion and additional lines.

Listen to songs in the style in which you write and analyze. Their formats to see how far other exponents have trapped or left the traditional formats. If you are familiar with the rules or conventions they use, you can experiment by breaking them.

There is much more about making music plus a free book to download at www.making-music.com.

 

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